Woman at Early Pregnancy Holding Belly

Are you trying to get pregnant? Are you just waiting for proof of the good news and don’t know how to tell that you are pregnant? 


Even though ultrasounds and pregnancy tests are the only way to tell you for sure, you can keep an eye out for some other signs and symptoms. Although most women may depend on the trusty pregnancy test or missed period, there are other indicators that can help you figure out if you’ll be expecting a child. 


When Do The Signs Start?

Surprisingly enough, the first week of pregnancy is determined by the date of your last menstrual period. Week 1 of your pregnancy will be your last menstrual period, even if you weren’t actually pregnant yet. 


Knowing this, your delivery date would also be determined based on the first day of your last period. Even though you may not be feeling any symptoms during a certain time, it can still be a part of your 40-week pregnancy. 


Knowing when you’re pregnant is different for each and every woman. Some women may suspect that they are pregnant within the first few days, while others won’t notice until they miss a period, or even months after conception. 


Early Pregnancy Symptoms

If you’re wondering if you might be pregnant, look out for these early pregnancy symptoms:


Missed Period 

This may be the most common and well known early sign of pregnancy, and one that many women experience before realizing they’re pregnant - a missed period. The thing about a missed period is that not all missed or late periods are caused by pregnancy. 


Gaining or losing a lot of weight, experiencing hormonal changes, and being stressed are all factors that can cause a missed or late period. However if you do miss your period, it would be a good idea to take a pregnancy test to be sure. 


Spotting 

Light spotting can sometimes be one of the first signs of pregnancy. After conception, the fertilized egg attaches to the lining of your uterus which can cause light spotting, often called implantation bleeding. This can happen anywhere from 6 to 14 days after conception. 


Breast Changes 

Experiencing body changes is a very common early sign of pregnancy for many women. After conception, your hormones rapidly change which may result in your breasts to become tender,  swollen, or sore a couple weeks later. Although you may feel a little discomfort at the start, the pain will most likely decrease as time goes on and your body gets used to the hormonal changes. 


Frequent Urination 

Pregnant Woman Holding Belly

If you’re noticing that you need to visit the washroom more often, it may be a sign that you’re pregnant. This is because the amount of blood in your body will increase when you’re pregnant, which causes your kidneys to process extra fluid that will end up in your bladder. For many women, frequent urination may start around 7 weeks after conception. 


Nausea 

Morning sickness is an early sign of pregnancy that is most commonly complained about. However, not every woman gets it. Nausea can strike at any time of the day or night (most commonly in the morning) and can start about one month after becoming pregnant. 


A factor that can play into nausea is a woman’s sensitivity to certain foods and scents. Many women experience pregnancy cravings, but also have certain foods they can’t stand when they become pregnant, which can trigger the nausea. 


Fatigue 

Woman With Pregnancy Fatigue

Experiencing fatigue during pregnancy is very common for most women, even starting early on. Women can experience fatigue as early as one week after conception. This is mostly due to a hormone called progesterone, increased blood production, lower blood sugar levels and blood pressure. 


Sleep disturbances such as needing to urinate more frequently and feeling nauseous can also play a role in increased fatigue. 


The Big Picture 

The truth is that some women may experience just one or two of these symptoms, and some may experience more - Every pregnancy is different. If you are experiencing any symptoms that are too discomforting, be sure to contact your doctor to plan a way to cope with them!